Culture – It’s What’s for Business!

Do you ever feel there’s something missing in your day-to-day work? Maybe you feel like you don’t exactly fit in, or perhaps there is something “off” about the company you currently work for. Maybe you are just simply looking for something bigger, better and more significant.

You are not alone! According to an article in Harvard Business Review, 7 out of 10 people are not actively engaged at work. This not only impacts each employee’s happiness, but costs an estimated $450 billion in lost productivity each year. That’s billion, with a “b.”

Lack of engagement is bad news for companies, but also equates to a challenge for career-oriented professionals who desire a challenge and want to be a part of a larger purpose. If the company cannot tackle the issue of engagement, talented professionals will go elsewhere. This begs the question – what should you consider if you are wanting to make a positive change in your career trajectory?

Find a Culture Fit

When you feel like there is something missing from your career, it impacts every aspect of life. Perhaps you like your current role, but the company itself is not in alignment with your overall goals. Successful leaders will advise you: choose the company, and choose the leadership, rather than the job itself. Look for a company that has a culture that is in alignment with who you are.

The culture of an organization showcases its beliefs, values, and behaviors. By investing time in learning about a company’s culture, you can find a workplace that aligns with your personal goals. It should be relatively easy to learn about a company’s culture, because organizations are very aware of the advantage a positive culture brings. If you cannot find out about the culture, that is your first sign you don’t want to pursue that company any further.

A recent Forbes article outlines how organization’s that focus on culture are becoming icons for both job seekers and those looking to fulfill a larger purpose. Reasons listed include:

  • Younger companies that focus on culture see a huge payoff (think HubSpot with its culture manifesto).
  • NetFlix’s culture manifesto “freedom with responsibility” is one of the most popular documents on the internet, 11 million+ viewers.
  • Value statements have popped up everywhere. Examples include Zappos’ cultural values focus on innovation, Google’s 10 “truths” (focus on the user is one), and LinkedIn being in the “human service” business and calls itself a “tribe.”

Obviously, culture is a focus for many organizations. Those who understand the value will be actively creating and cultivating a culture. Those who don’t may not realize that culture happens whether you focus on it or not, and are the ones who end up with a culture you may not desire.

Make the Best Choice for You 

Finding a culture that aligns with your value set is key to your success and happiness. The following tips will help you get started on discovering the best business opportunity for you:

  1. Write down your values and goals. Make sure to be specific and think long-term.
  2. Review the company website for their culture information. At Share On Purpose, we are very clear on our culture and focus – “to inspire potential in others while launching game-changing ideas. We believe in creating BOTH meaningful vocation and financial success.”
  3. Consider reviewing survey websites. Many current and former employees will provide their feedback on a company through sites likes Glassdoor. One caveat – review these with a critical eye. It’s very easy for people to voice “sour grapes” on these sites, so review them for valid content that provides good feedback.

Finally, don’t wait until you are completely unhappy or out of a job to start seeking your next opportunity. It takes time to find the best organization for you, so start earlier and invest time in really understanding the type of opportunity you desire. For those who crave an entrepreneurial environment filled with opportunities for high performing individuals, please check out the open positions at Share On Purpose. Starting now gives you the best chance to find the ideal place for you.

2017: A Year of Possibilities

2017: A Year of Possibilities

A new year has arrived, and with that comes a time of reflection on the previous year. Many of us think back on the highs and lows, the best moments of the year, and what we would have done differently. Resolutions are frequently made to address the things we looked back on and felt needed improvement. These resolutions can be life changing, or, all too frequently, they fizzle out before the season changes and we’re repeating the mistakes of the previous year.

Intentions, Not Resolutions

The word “resolution” has developed a reputation as being something you either win or lose at. One misstep and it’s right back to your old ways. There doesn’t seem to be a way to course correct.

If you think about your goal as an intention, it changes your behavior long term. You can struggle, and even fail at moments, but that doesn’t mean it’s over. An intention has no expiration date, so keep going.

Resolutions are too easily broken. This year, don’t resolve to improve or change something. Intend to do it.

Choose Wisely

A new year inspires many of us to hit the reset button, but don’t overcommit. Deciding to improve your health, relationships, career, and financial situation all at one time will quickly overwhelm any person. Try focusing on the one area that will have the largest ripple effect.

Will improving your health give you more energy to excel during the workday and still enjoy time with your family?

Will finding a fulfilling career make you happier overall to positively affect your health and relationships?

Once you’ve identified what will have the largest impact, set the appropriate intention and start working.

Purpose and Intentions

For many of us, the thing we decide to change in a new year really comes down to what will make us happier. There is a direct correlation between following your passion and personal fulfillment. This year, take the time to not only reflect on the previous year, but also focus on your purpose and how it can be deployed moving forward.

 

A Place of Possibilities

Share On Purpose has long recognized the formula that intention multiplied by purpose results in fulfillment and success. We ensure each member of the Share family finds their purpose, then allow them the opportunity to chart their own career path doing work they love.

This year, we challenge each of you to skip the resolutions, and instead, focus on improving one area of your life that will bring you the most joy. Determine how you can apply your purpose to that area, and set the appropriate intention.

“Cheers to a new year and another chance for us to get it right.” -Oprah Winfrey

The Peace Pact

I’ve now participated in over 12 elections, voting for some democrats, as well as several Republicans.

Each election was more contentious than the one before, as politicians fought over the 2-5% of the population that isn’t firmly entrenched and divided.

This saddens me. There has to be a better way.  Maybe it’s not the politicians who need to change, but us, the electorate. Politicians simply mirror the people, and we are a deeply divided nation.

So, I’ve set a goal to create peace in my own little corner of the world through three pacts:

1) Judgement Free:

I commit to stop criticizing others, period. I did better with this in 2016, but still have a long way to go.

Yes, I will retain my strong opinions, beliefs and ideas. But the difference between an opinion and a judgement is dangerous.

Opinions are personal, they are about me or what I believe. Judgements are about others, or what others believe. Lets keep opinions, but drop ALL judgement.

Speak of the great things about your party, candidate or sports team, without making the other side/team wrong for theirs.

2) Positive Perspectives:

I commit to seeing only the good in others, even if I don’t agree with them. Rather than criticism, I will point out compassionate and more kind ways of sharing opinions, on both sides of the aisle.

And no matter what happens, I commit to look for the good in it.

I will replace negative views with a simple practice: assume positive intent. Assume the other person, political party, entity, or group meant well, even if I don’t agree with their actions or beliefs.

3) Appreciation Rules:

I commit to making appreciation a daily practice. I’ve scheduled an “appreciation break” on my calendar each day so the very act of appreciation becomes a habit. I will find things to appreciate, daily.

Please join me in this Peace Pact! If there is a better way, it must start with each of us.