A Fit Organization

For job seekers evaluating a company, the guiding principles, as well as how these are used in business decisions, speak volumes about a prospective employer. Said another way, for you to “fit” a company’s culture, you must both understand these values and their importance to culture.

The reason for this is that skills can be taught, culture can’t. For a culture to be real, every team member must be aligned with the culture and guiding principles. Because of our commitment to Career3 and specifically to promoting from within, we needed to define a value specific to knowledge acquisition. The founding leaders of Share On Purpose asked ourselves a bold question: How would we build a “learning organization” in an uncertain, rapidly changing world? And, how would we grow our management team so they led with these values consistently? Ultimately, we wanted to know how to strengthen our culture as we expanded.

There are many things I’ve learned from the Millennial generation, but what resonated about their learning style was what I termed “just in time knowledge.” Millennials are quick to learn and incredibly resourceful knowledge seekers. They don’t learn because they are told to, or because they want to accumulate knowledge, they learn to apply the knowledge to enhance their lives or grow their careers. Novel concept, I know.

The principle we adopted regarding training and mentoring, with the help of our initial team members was “New Knowledge – Learn it as you need it.” Knowledge is (and always has been) power, which is why college degrees became a necessary management criterion in the Baby Boomer era. The problem with the accumulation of knowledge today is that our world is changing so fast that most skills are outdated less than a year after they are learned.

For our guiding principles to resonate with the way future generations learn, we had to rethink all traditional training models, and embrace the “just in time” learning modality. That meant defining the value, New Knowledge, and rethinking the Career Matrix to introduce management skills as leaders evolved their careers. It also meant investing in the Share School Online Leadership Training Portal to make the training available when emerging leaders needed it, rather than when we wanted to teach it. This resulted in a culture where leaders embrace the notion that to truly evolve our talent, we work on their leadership evolution timeline, rather than training them to fit our needs.

There are many things that contribute to building a performance culture, but one of the most important is to use a defined set of values so that business decisions are aligned with the culture; and then to embed these values into all facets of the organization, especially training. Without guiding principles, decision-making can erode culture.

Remember, skills can be taught, but culture can’t.

If this sounds like an organization you’d like to be a part of, view our available positions and apply now.

Building a Performance Culture

Building a performance culture starts with understanding that employees desire to GET something from your organization, as much as they want to give their best. It’s a 2-way street, just like any other relationship.

The mistake most leaders make is that they focus only on their half of the relationship, expecting, and in some cases, demanding performance. This never works, because mediocre performers always return to their ordinary levels of performance once the pressure is off. Conversely, if you hire high performers intentionally, you won’t need to motivate them to perform at their best, because they are intrinsically driven to do so without your guidance.

The truth is, as leaders we don’t want to manage staff performance. What we REALLY want is to hire and promote leaders who are intrinsically driven to perform. True performers excel, with or without our leadership, because of WHO THEY ARE, not because of what we expect.

So, the question in building a performance culture isn’t, “How do I drive performance?”, but instead, “How do I attract performers?” Here are 3 tips we’ve used to build a performance culture at Share On Purpose:

  • Authenticity Attracts: Promote who you are, at your company’s core, rather than who you want to be. True performers value honesty and directness, and probably have done enough of their own research anyway. In addition, they enjoy being a part of the solution, which means being part of performance improvement.

In addition, discuss openly what your guiding principles are, as well as how you’re living them. This is key, because true performers will ask those they encounter during the interview process, as to what your culture is. If your front-line talent team doesn’t know how to define your culture, it will turn performers off since they value authenticity and transparency.

As part of our effort to ensure transparency at Share On Purpose, we not only outline our Culture on our website, but have defined the Guiding Principles that make our culture work. These Guiding Principles were developed WITH our key leaders back in late 2013.

Starting in October, as CEO, I will dedicate one article per month to writing about each principle. In addition, we’ll share an honest assessment of how one of our leaders or team members is demonstrating this principle through another article. Although we’re far from perfect, we pride ourselves on striving for excellence and that includes promoting what our leaders are doing to live our brand.

Culture doesn’t happen because we put words on the website, or even on the wall. Culture, and in particular a performance culture, happens when you manage the company, its leaders and its associates to a set of guiding principles that make the culture authentic.

  • Together is More: Never forget, for a second, that true performers are recruited constantly by other organizations. If you want them to stay, build an organization worthy of their commitment. That requires building a relationship with them, investing in their development, and of course, listening to their feedback. Not only will this serve you in the good times, but it will also breed loyalty in the hard times.

Today, the job market is strong, and top performers inside most brands are looking for new roles outside their organization. Research shows that the reason they are doing this is because they don’t feel valued in their current organization, and/or they do not have a relationship with a top executive. Part of the reason why our executives dedicate 25% of their time to mentoring and developing performers is because we VALUE our current team as individuals, in addition to both their contribution, and future value.

The best advice I ever got from one of my mentors, my former CEO Burl Hogins, was to constantly “re-recruit” my best people. By meeting with them frequently, and learning about their passions and interests, I can ensure that I am supporting THEIR career ambitions, as well as my business goals. I’ve never forgotten that lesson. Thank you Burl.

  • Measure What Matters: When you hire performers, you don’t have to manage them. That’s the good news. But you do have to manage performance, just not for the reasons one may think. We measure what matters, not for our business, but for the leaders themselves. By letting leaders know where they are, in as many ways as possible, they will motivate themselves and their teams to improve results.

Now, I’m not advocating meaningless reports or needless management meetings. Just the opposite, in fact. Keep your meetings short (less than 30 minutes, if possible). Find ways to track meaningful statistics in every area of the business and share these statistics openly with your team. Let them know where they stand against the goals, and inspire them to achieve those goals. When you measure what matters, performers rise to the occasion. On their own.

Again, watch for future articles about our guiding principles and culture as we want to attract performers who fit our culture and who aspire to BE MORE.

If you’re ready to become part of a performance culture, and if these 3 tips sound like they fit who you are, check out our open positions. We’re always looking for smart, driven leaders.

Purpose + Passion = Career Nirvana

Zing moment – that is how Stephanie Renna, Senior Talent Manager at Share on Purpose, describes the experience of finding her purpose.

“Like many others, I thought my purpose had to fit the work I was doing. I didn’t realize it was something bigger,” said Stephanie. “When I stopped overthinking it and put the words to what I wanted, I had that ZING moment!”

Finding her purpose, combined with being in a place with so many possibilities, has positively impacted Stephanie’s career. With her performance mindset and ability to persevere, she has achieved new levels of success.

Stephanie started in one of Share On Purpose’s portfolio companies in 2012 (before it was even called Share On Purpose) working in a marketing role. At that time, she was given opportunities to stretch and grow her skill set.

“I went from 9 hours a day in a cubicle, focused on one aspect of marketing, to a position where I was exposed to all areas of business. It was exciting because my degree is in advertising and marketing, so I felt it was a better fit,” said Stephanie.

It’s Different at a Growth Focused Company 

Stephanie will attest to the fact that things move quickly at Share On Purpose. Her career changed as the organization grew. Working with multiple brands within the portfolio exposed her to new services and clients, which allowed her to expand her skill set beyond marketing.

It was through the portfolio’s training organization, Succeed On Purpose, that Stephanie became familiar with the power purpose. Realizing this was a critical step to her own success, she began working with Terri Maxwell, CEO of Share On Purpose, to uncover her life purpose. It took time, but Stephanie eventually discovered her purpose was to bring joy.

Once an individual is able to put words to their purpose, he or she can chart a career path that aligns with the type of work that will fulfill them.

“The next step was to determine the work I was most passionate about. I’d been exposed to elements of staffing and training in a few of the brands and really loved that work. Fortunately, the portfolio was experiencing rapid growth and there was a need for a position utilizing those skills. I began my transition from Engagement Manager to Talent Manager in 2016.”

Working On Purpose

Share On Purpose is a place of possibilities. Our focus on launching a new brand annually, coupled with our dedication to ensuring employees are doing work they love, allows individuals to try new roles in a safe environment. Once an associate finds one that is the right fit, he or she is developed quickly to grow into a leadership position and build a career that aligns with their passion and purpose.

Stephanie was able to find a new role within the organization that fit both her passion and purpose, and has since built the talent department. The process wasn’t easy, but it was rewarding.

“I spent four years with Share before this opportunity presented itself. And 18 months after my transition began, I’m still working on projects in other areas,” said Stephanie. “That’s fine because I know I’m in the right place and that ultimately, I’ll be an executive doing work I love full time.”

“I am happier now, even though it took a lot of trial and error to get here. When I first discovered my purpose was to bring joy, I thought I would have to go to clown school to fulfill it. I’m relieved that is not the case,” chuckled Stephanie.

Share On Purpose is unique in that we have a portfolio of companies that allows us to support our team members in finding the brand they like best. Additionally, the culture is built to support dedicated team members in succeeding, sometimes even providing a new career path that aligns with the portfolio’s growth. Stephanie is one of several success stories.

If working in a place of possibilities resonates with you, consider applying for one of our open positions.

The Rocket Fuel for Your Career – Mentoring

Most know mentoring is important to career success, yet there are few organizations that have built effective programs. This is largely due the time intensive nature required in one-to-one mentorship, but also because mentoring is not built INTO company culture. At Share, we expect all leaders to mentor not as an additional responsibility, but as part of their core leadership function. This results in a culture by which team members receive consistent, constant mentoring throughout their career.

To be effective, mentoring should not only occur regularly, but be thought of as part of building a performance culture. For Share new hires, mentoring opportunities begin on Day 1, and each associate has at least one, if not two mentors by the end of their first month. Twenty-five percent of each leaders’ week is dedicated to mentoring team members.

Recently we interviewed two new Share On Purpose associates to understand first-hand how mentoring has rocketed their careers forward.

Taylor Jackson was interested in working with us specifically for mentoring. She was looking for insights, advice and best practices to create a roadmap to success. In Taylor’s prior position, she did not receive any mentoring, and was deeply aware of the importance it would bring to her career.

“The leadership at my last job was critical and not supportive. If we asked for help, they told us to go to workshops,” said Taylor. “It was my first position out of college, and I had to teach myself the ins and outs of my position. My hope was to find someone who would mentor me on how to be successful.”

Immediately after starting at Share, Taylor noticed the commitment to mentoring.

“Honestly I was surprised to find a company like this even existed. Although we work remotely, the leadership team is consistently involved in my success and the environment is very positive,” she said. “On the occasions where a mistake was, the leadership team simply helped me course correct to improve results. The focus was on improving results, rather than doing something wrong. The leaders even shared their best practices to assist me in accelerating progress.”

The encouragement Taylor received helped her advance quickly into new positions. She began as an apprentice, and is now working with the CEO to develop a new department that will serve multiple brands.

“I receive one-on-one mentoring from senior leadership, in particular R’ymonda Davis, on how to gain new skill sets, how to excel and how to quickly overcome any challenges,” said Taylor. “It’s a true team environment, with everyone working toward a common goal.”

Mentorship Surpasses Experience

For Jamen Sisk, the experience is similar, even though he is in a completely different role (business development) and comes from a totally different background.

Jamen admitted that prior to coming to Share he rarely received effective mentoring. With more business experience, the lack of professional mentoring is even more pronounced.

“In the past, the mentoring I received was very limited. I always felt like I was taking up someone else’s time, or that others did not want to take the time to ensure I was successful,” said Jamen.

Jamen believes that the reason the mentoring is so successful at Share is the culture.

“Even though I have a business development background, when I got to Share we had several accounts in an industry I was less familiar with. Thanks to the support of the team, and in particular Dharmini Patel, I came up to speed quickly,” said Jamen. “I received detailed, thorough explanations that equipped me to better serve our clients, and set me up for success.”

Jamen notes that he has been encouraged to step outside his comfort zone and to challenge himself to be progressive, and proactive.

“The team environment coupled with the supportive, on-going mentorship has improved my problem-solving skills, as well as my ability to think critically,” said Jamen. “As a result, I am better prepared to mentor new team members.”

Mentor to More

When asked about what she would tell others the importance of quality mentoring, Taylor had this to say:

“In general, the environment should be motivational. The executives should truly want you to succeed. I’ve never heard of a company whose executives meet with you so frequently to provide personal and professional development. It’s genuine, and the leaders take the time to develop each person. I think that’s amazing.”

Jamen added, “To fast track your career, there is no other place to come. The support and transparency is phenomenal. The culture lends itself to promoting success.”

Both Taylor and Jamen, while having different backgrounds, experiences and career paths, received the same quality mentoring, by different executives. That is intentional, because the culture is designed to develop leaders who want to grow, excel and achieve more.

Share On Purpose has several positions open for motivated people who desire rapid growth. To apply for one of our positions, simply visit our careers page of the website.

Life Happens 24/7, So Work Like It Does

We’ve heard that even in salaried positions, most professionals feel like they have to punch a time clock. You have to ask for time off to go to the doctor. If you want to take a long lunch to catch up with a college friend in town, you have to ask permission.

I don’t know about you, but at Share On Purpose, we feel like this kind of oversight is old school management, not designed for next generation professionals.

At most companies, the concept of work/life balance is to work eight-plus hours a day (usually an 8-5 regiment), and the time after 5PM is your time to handle life duties and schedule fun activities. Why do most managers think that life is only meant to be lived AFTER 5 PM?

Work Success Should Be Results-based, Not Time-based

If you’re frustrated with the 8-5 foolishness, it’s probably because you know that time worked has nothing to do with results gained. So, isn’t it time to be treated like an adult? Isn’t it time to be compensated based on results, rather than time spent in a cube?

At Share On Purpose, we believe that professionals should be in charge of their own time. Other than pre-set company and client meetings, for the most part, our team members determine their own schedule. Each person gets to figure out his/her productivity cycle, whether a night owl or early bird. Need some extra time off for personal errands? No problem. Want to take a long lunch? Great! We treat our associates like adults, and expect each person to manage their time so that work gets done and team goals are met.

So, Now What?

If you’re tired of working a schedule, regardless of the need to get work done, the first step is to admit that an 8-5 schedule doesn’t meet your idea of work-life balance.

Second, if you’re ready to look for a performance-based role where you work output is the focus, not your physical presence, then you have to ask yourself: What am I willing to do to have time freedom? Working for an organization that provides the freedom to set individual schedules or work remotely is a perk, but it comes with added responsibility. Be clear on what you’re looking for from your career and what you’re willing to do to get it.

Do you prefer a job that you can work at for eight hours and then leave completely at the end of the day? Or are you looking for an environment where you have complete ownership of deliverables and your impact is felt throughout the organization, as well as your clients?

Here are a few questions to get started:

  • Are you comfortable in a macro-management environment where you manage yourself, and your team leads towards performance?
  • Are you disciplined enough to set goals and drive completion without manager oversight?
  • Are you driven enough to put in extra time when necessary for the success of your team?

The benefit of being disciplined and driven is that you’re rewarded with flexibility and are treated like a responsible adult. Great companies usually have a culture that rewards smart, motivated professionals who want to work hard and still enjoy true work/life balance.

Consider Share On Purpose

Share On Purpose cultivates new companies and leaders to run them. We are planning to launch a new brand every year, so driven professionals will have plenty of upward career mobility. We are looking for driven leaders who are seeking a meaningful career, and not just a better job. If you enjoy flexibility, freedom, winning and want to work with a team of like-minded professionals, then you should check us out. Our team understands that each person works on their own schedule and we don’t believe you should have to settle for a time-obsessed job where the focus is on time spent and not results delivered.

To learn more about working at Share On Purpose, simply click here. We are hiring for multiple positions, so apply today!

So You Want to Grow Faster?

If you like to advance your career quickly, the rest of the world can seem to almost stand still. It can be extremely frustrating to put your all into a job, only to find out you have to wait for an annual review in order to move forward.

Do you feel stuck or underappreciated? You know you’re ready for the next level, so why does it take so long?

Tired of Waiting on Someone Else?

Share On Purpose dumped the entire annual review process and opted for the ingenious Career Matrix (developed by Talent On Purpose), which lays out the specific skills each associate has to master in order to get promoted. It also outlines clear salary ranges for achievements at each level.

Patience Carter, a team member of the Share brand, Promote On Purpose, has been working her way through the Career Matrix.

“I’ve been with Share On Purpose since August of 2016, and in 8 months I’ve received 3 promotions. My salary increased by 53%. I decide how fast I want to grow, and our management team develops my skills through experience, opportunities and mentoring. My goal is to be at the Director level by Q4 of 2017.” – Patience Carter

Make It Happen!

You know you’re worth more, so why wait for others to appreciate you? It’s time to use your drive to find professional and financial success. Be ready to articulate why you’re ready to advance your career and in which direction.

  1. What’s your strength? Are you analytical, have natural leadership ability, can drive to great results? Do you love to win? These are all attributes that should be moving you forward quickly along your career path.
  2. Where is your passion? Do you enjoy an entrepreneurial environment? Do you love building teams, departments, or even companies? Embrace these traits!
  3. What do you really, really want? This seems like a silly question. Of course, you know what you want, right? Being ambitious, we tend to want what will move us forward more quickly, which may not be what we really want. It is worth the time and energy to sit down and focus on this question. Becoming clear on what you really want will make it easier to find a role that truly fits your strengths, passion and purpose.

Stop Waiting and Start Moving

Share On Purpose is an organization of high performers who want to advance quickly. They crave constant (and constructive) feedback, but prefer it is given in real-time as part of a career advancement process, rather than an HR-driven annual review policy. They also want real mentoring from executives and leaders who’ve walked in their shoes.

That’s why Share dedicates 20% of its top executives’ time to work with our team members: training, mentoring, and coaching. 20% – that’s one full day a week dedicated to growing talent.

Share On Purpose is planning on launching one new brand a year, and in order to develop the leadership team for those new companies (since promotions are predominately from within) we begin to prepare tomorrow’s leaders today. At Share, you grow as fast as you’re able to demonstrate the skills.

To learn more about working at Share On Purpose, simply click here to find the position that will start you on a career path where you’re appreciated and there are no limits.

 

Culture – It’s What’s for Business!

Do you ever feel there’s something missing in your day-to-day work? Maybe you feel like you don’t exactly fit in, or perhaps there is something “off” about the company you currently work for. Maybe you are just simply looking for something bigger, better and more significant.

You are not alone! According to an article in Harvard Business Review, 7 out of 10 people are not actively engaged at work. This not only impacts each employee’s happiness, but costs an estimated $450 billion in lost productivity each year. That’s billion, with a “b.”

Lack of engagement is bad news for companies, but also equates to a challenge for career-oriented professionals who desire a challenge and want to be a part of a larger purpose. If the company cannot tackle the issue of engagement, talented professionals will go elsewhere. This begs the question – what should you consider if you are wanting to make a positive change in your career trajectory?

Find a Culture Fit

When you feel like there is something missing from your career, it impacts every aspect of life. Perhaps you like your current role, but the company itself is not in alignment with your overall goals. Successful leaders will advise you: choose the company, and choose the leadership, rather than the job itself. Look for a company that has a culture that is in alignment with who you are.

The culture of an organization showcases its beliefs, values, and behaviors. By investing time in learning about a company’s culture, you can find a workplace that aligns with your personal goals. It should be relatively easy to learn about a company’s culture, because organizations are very aware of the advantage a positive culture brings. If you cannot find out about the culture, that is your first sign you don’t want to pursue that company any further.

A recent Forbes article outlines how organization’s that focus on culture are becoming icons for both job seekers and those looking to fulfill a larger purpose. Reasons listed include:

  • Younger companies that focus on culture see a huge payoff (think HubSpot with its culture manifesto).
  • NetFlix’s culture manifesto “freedom with responsibility” is one of the most popular documents on the internet, 11 million+ viewers.
  • Value statements have popped up everywhere. Examples include Zappos’ cultural values focus on innovation, Google’s 10 “truths” (focus on the user is one), and LinkedIn being in the “human service” business and calls itself a “tribe.”

Obviously, culture is a focus for many organizations. Those who understand the value will be actively creating and cultivating a culture. Those who don’t may not realize that culture happens whether you focus on it or not, and are the ones who end up with a culture you may not desire.

Make the Best Choice for You 

Finding a culture that aligns with your value set is key to your success and happiness. The following tips will help you get started on discovering the best business opportunity for you:

  1. Write down your values and goals. Make sure to be specific and think long-term.
  2. Review the company website for their culture information. At Share On Purpose, we are very clear on our culture and focus – “to inspire potential in others while launching game-changing ideas. We believe in creating BOTH meaningful vocation and financial success.”
  3. Consider reviewing survey websites. Many current and former employees will provide their feedback on a company through sites likes Glassdoor. One caveat – review these with a critical eye. It’s very easy for people to voice “sour grapes” on these sites, so review them for valid content that provides good feedback.

Finally, don’t wait until you are completely unhappy or out of a job to start seeking your next opportunity. It takes time to find the best organization for you, so start earlier and invest time in really understanding the type of opportunity you desire. For those who crave an entrepreneurial environment filled with opportunities for high performing individuals, please check out the open positions at Share On Purpose. Starting now gives you the best chance to find the ideal place for you.

The Power of Appreciation

It’s no secret that showing appreciation accelerates growth. In fact, in the US we have a March holiday specifically for employee appreciation (who knew?). Philosophically, we don’t agree with this annual holiday, because quite simply, we believe employee appreciation is not a one day event.

Because employees play a critical role in all types of businesses, it is our belief that appreciation should be an on-going effort, if for no other reason than it impacts the bottom line. Decades of Gallup research has consistently proven that the more satisfied employees are, the more likely it will correlate with customer satisfaction and shareholder returns. This is particularly true in service companies, where employees ARE the product – they produce the revenue through their individual and collective work.

At Share On Purpose, our cultural foundation includes what we call “acts of appreciation.” Acts of appreciation include: gratitude texts (messages), appreciation emails, private “thank you” conversations, financial rewards (Share Bucks™) and totems such as The Giving Keys which memorialize key cultural accomplishments. Our entire executive team role models frequent appreciation for staff members in order to ensure that we are consistently focused on the importance of every team member.

In addition to “acts of appreciation,” we eliminated the annual review system and instead opted for frequent mentoring, on-the-spot-coaching, and leadership development programs. This is extremely effective in our culture because of an ingenious system called The Career Matrix™ (created by Talent On Purpose) which gives employees a clear, predominantly self-directed, development path. The Career Matrix encourages each associate to seek feedback as part of their development path, rather than as an annual process. In essence, they seek the continuous feedback to advance through the matrix, and then focus their training efforts around the leadership skills needed to advance to the next level.

This process enables our executive team to spend their energy developing leaders rather than filling out annual review documents. Developmental coaching, as well as frequent feedback, is a key form of appreciation especially when it’s guided toward the career aspirations of employees, rather than an annual requirement.

These various forms of appreciation have attracted high performers in every segment of our portfolio, which in turn has accelerated our financial performance and growth. Additionally, it has created a culture that endures difficulty, embraces progress, and focuses on individual, team and brand development in a positive manner.

So, if your current company doesn’t appreciate you frequently, for example, they do not invest in your development, maybe it’s time to appreciate yourself and make a change. Start now by learning more about our open positions. Make every day appreciation day!

The Peace Pact

I’ve now participated in over 12 elections, voting for some democrats, as well as several Republicans.

Each election was more contentious than the one before, as politicians fought over the 2-5% of the population that isn’t firmly entrenched and divided.

This saddens me. There has to be a better way.  Maybe it’s not the politicians who need to change, but us, the electorate. Politicians simply mirror the people, and we are a deeply divided nation.

So, I’ve set a goal to create peace in my own little corner of the world through three pacts:

1) Judgement Free:

I commit to stop criticizing others, period. I did better with this in 2016, but still have a long way to go.

Yes, I will retain my strong opinions, beliefs and ideas. But the difference between an opinion and a judgement is dangerous.

Opinions are personal, they are about me or what I believe. Judgements are about others, or what others believe. Lets keep opinions, but drop ALL judgement.

Speak of the great things about your party, candidate or sports team, without making the other side/team wrong for theirs.

2) Positive Perspectives:

I commit to seeing only the good in others, even if I don’t agree with them. Rather than criticism, I will point out compassionate and more kind ways of sharing opinions, on both sides of the aisle.

And no matter what happens, I commit to look for the good in it.

I will replace negative views with a simple practice: assume positive intent. Assume the other person, political party, entity, or group meant well, even if I don’t agree with their actions or beliefs.

3) Appreciation Rules:

I commit to making appreciation a daily practice. I’ve scheduled an “appreciation break” on my calendar each day so the very act of appreciation becomes a habit. I will find things to appreciate, daily.

Please join me in this Peace Pact! If there is a better way, it must start with each of us.